3 Current WTA ranking

Petra

bio

Petra was born to Jiří Kvita and Pavla Kvitová in Bilovec, a small town in the east of the Czech Republic. Her family spent a lot of time playing tennis at the local club and Petra started on her tennis journey by picking up balls for her brothers, Libor and Jiří, at 3 years old.

Petra’s father, a self-taught tennis player, became her coach growing up and used to show Petra videos of Martina Navratilova playing at Wimbledon, which she would watch with fascination.

I have so much respect for Martina, I watched her on television when I was a child, and that’s where I learnt about Wimbledon and playing on grass. It is nice to know that I have her support and it was special to see her on Centre Court when I won the title.

Growing up in Fulnek where there was only a short window for outdoor sports because of harsh winter weather, Petra spent a lot of time training on fast indoor surfaces, where she learned to play fast and hit flat. This had a huge impact on how Petra honed her game and developed the all-out attacking style for which she is now renowned.

It was not until Petra won the junior tournament of Pardubice, a prestigious event in the Czech Republic, that her family decided it was time for her to start pursuing a professional career. In 2006, Petra moved to the famous Prostejov Tennis Club, away from home and family. It was not an easy transition for a 16-year-old girl, but Petra adapted quickly and started to show rapid progress.

In 2007, Petra won four ITF singles titles and rose from No.773 to No.157 in the world. In 2008, Petra achieved direct entry into her first ever Grand Slam event at Roland Garros. She reached the last 16 and finished the year ranked No.44 in the world. This was also the year she joined forces with her coach, David Kotyza.

2011 was a spectacular breakthrough year for Petra. She started off by cracking the top 10 in the world after winning her first clay-court tournament in Madrid. Two months later, she lifted the Venus Rosewater Dish at Wimbledon, marching through the draw and stunning Maria Sharapova in the final. Her life was to change forever…

“The Wimbledon final is a very happy memory for me. I was so focused on match point that when I won it felt like a dream. It was strange, I had a dream about winning Wimbledon during the French Open that year, and then a couple of weeks later it came true. I couldn’t believe it. It was definitely one of the happiest moments
of my life.”

Petra became the first player born in 1990s, male or female, to win a Grand Slam title. She finished the 2011 season winning the prestigious season-ending WTA Championships in Istanbul and climbed to No.2 in the world. To cap off a dream year, which included 6 titles in total, she proudly led the Czech team to Fed Cup victory for the first time since 1988.

Petra had a solid 2012 season despite injury and illness, resulting in two Grand Slam semifinals at the Australian Open and Roland Garros, and she reached the quarterfinal at Wimbledon as defending champion, losing out to eventual champion Serena Williams. She was also crowned the Emirates US Open Series champion, with two titles at Montreal and New Haven. She led her country to a second successive Fed Cup triumph in the same year that the Czech Republic also pulled off victory in the Davis Cup.

“2012 was a wonderful year for Czech tennis. Winning the Fed Cup and Davis Cup at home was unbelievable. The support we received from the home crowd was amazing and it was special to see what tennis means to our country. I hope we can keep growing tennis as a sport to compete with football and ice hockey and I hope we can inspire children to want to play tennis.”